Onor Crummay

I’m delighted to have this opportunity to give something back to Meningitis Now and make a difference with their work in our local community

Onor Crummay

Community ambassador

In November 2008, I was in my first term at Bristol University when I suddenly fell ill with bacterial meningitis and septicaemia. I spent a week in hospital before returning home to recuperate and although I tried to return to university, I found that I couldn’t cope with the studying.

I was also very emotional, I felt physically drained and my memory felt very foggy. Following an MRI scan, I discovered I had temporary brain impairment, so I was forced to leave university and recover. I returned to university in 2009 and in 2012 I became both a history graduate and a Community Ambassador for Meningitis Now. 

I am now a history teacher at Bishop Challoner School and I see surviving meningitis as a platform for me to be able to raise awareness of this dreadful disease.

I’m delighted to have this opportunity to give something back to Meningitis Now and make a difference with their work in our local community. With their support, no-one will have to face meningitis alone. I know only too well how cruel this disease can be and I don’t want other local families to go through what we have. It’s vital that everybody recognises the signs and symptoms and knows what action to take if they suspect meningitis. This role will be a challenge but I’m determined to make a difference.

Get in touch with Onor here
  • Holly M

    Holly McNaughton

    Community ambassador

    Hi, I’m Holly. I first became familiar with meningitis when my mum contracted it on 14th April 2012.

  • Anne Cadden

    Anne Cadden

    Community ambassador

    In January 2001, my daughter, Helen, died from meningococcal septicaemia aged 18 while in her first year at university. A friend from Helen’s school, Richard Murphy, also died from meningitis seven weeks later at another university.

  • Lesley Leaver

    Lesley Leaver

    Community ambassador

    I lost my husband, Kevin, to meningococcal septicaemia in January 2000, just five hours after being admitted to hospital. I have been supported by Meningitis Now ever since. 

  • Anne Gaston

    Anne Gaston

    Community ambassador

    My son is now 21, but when he was six months old, he was rushed to hospital with suspected meningitis. Thankfully it turned out not to be meningitis, but it made me realise how little I knew about this devastating disease